How a Vegan Shoe is made

This week we want to to share with you the wonders of vegan shoes. You can read all about the leather industry, and why we chose another path here.

As you know veganism is more than a diet. It’s a lifestyle that defends eco, animal and people friendly methods. Slow fashion and circular economy give it life. The prosperity and freedom it nurtures, inspire us daily.

Human beings exist together, as a community, dependent of Nature, that needs a paradigm shift. Our happiness and inner peace are connected to all life and little gestures can really change the world around us.

One morning spent doing voluntary work, a lunch at your local vegan place, a trip to the market without plastic bags, a grunge second hand dress paired with some fiery vegan shoes. It may seem like a small step for a person, but it’s a giant step for a society where Love becomes the winning force.

Vegan shoes are part of an industry that works towards animal freedom, contributes to the well-being of the populations it touches, whether they are clients or workers, while constantly considering its environmental impact.

That is why we love and always try to be as close as possible to a circular economy. We wrote about it on our article about Piñatex, a material made from pineapple leafs, sustainably cultivated, for which no chemicals are used, and that is recycled and reused. A process that knows no waste, and where workers are properly paid and respected.

Mr. Luís Couto, head of Trofal, one of the factories we work with, explains how our vegan shoes are produced.

Cut: carefully handled quality control, to make sure no animal material slips in the process. There are materials that have to be cut by hand for precision, so that they keep the perfect shape for our feet’s comfort.

Sewing: sewed with highly resistant organic strings, that are adjusted to each sewing machine and material. Detailed tests are made for every product.

Construction: Everything is sewed like the “goodyear welted” process dictates. All is prepared in great detail, in a handcrafted process, where the isolation is made with a 4mm cork piece, between the insole and the midsole. This system doesn’t require toxic glues, because it’s incredibly well sowed. Machines must be carefully tuned so that the vegan materials can provide all the comfort and durability possible.

Finishing: The finishing is made with natural ointments and water based paint, keeping the sustainability principles.

The “Goodyear welted” requires 180 operations, many made by hand. It’s a process that needs time, and brings back some of the handcrafted ways, in which the environment and the principles of sustainability are respected.

Our favorite materials to work with are cork; Piñatex; made from pineapple leafs, recycled PET, certified organic cotton and vegan leather. Our choices have to do with each material’s sustainability, ethics and versatility. The plasticity and durability of this materials, allows for the creation of any sort of footwear. From this season’s most in sneakers, to the high knee classical boots, not forgetting the formal shoe, the mountain boot, nor the military boot. Giving up our personal style doesn’t need to be something inherent to veganism, quite the contrary! There are more and more good quality, long lasting pieces, impeccably designed, that turn any monotonous wardrobe into an unforgettable party!

It’s import to be aware, to read about the brands we choose to buy from, understand exactly what material and way of producing we are supporting, because that is vital for our future.

The brands that surround us are made of people that are just trying their best, and that, with our help, as more than consumers, active and informed citizens, can become amazing!

By being critical and active, questioning our favorite brands will make them realize they have more to win if they answer the new needs of their clients. It has never been easier to use our power as consumers, and never so many brands have shown an open mind to this sort of change.

Have an incredible day,

NAE

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